6 Ways Patch Management Can Improve Your IT Security Plan

When a patch is used correctly, it will improve the security of your IT plan. Patch management can give a company a more solid footing to fend off hackers.

6 Ways Patch Management Can Improve Your IT Security Plan

When a patch is used correctly, it will improve the security of your IT plan. Patch management can give a company a more solid footing to fend off hackers.

Network security is a tricky business. There are a ton of factors to consider when protecting an entire IT network for a company. Cybersecurity needs are a constantly evolving practice that must be analyzed at regular intervals to maintain a secure network. That includes having the proper firewalls, anti-virus software, and making sure each user is utilizing the right security safeguards. One of those measures to make an IT network more secure is through patch management. Are you familiar with what patch management is for a complex business network? LaScala IT Solutions is a top-rated security firm for any and all IT services, including enterprise patch management.

Patch management for enterprise computer networks

LaScala IT Solutions Understands Best Patch Management Practices

In case you aren’t entirely sure about what patch management involves, it’s the practice of using a piece of code or “a patch” to fix security issues in a software system. Think of it as a dose of medicine for an ailing system that is vulnerable to security breaches or attacks. When a patch is used correctly, it can improve the security of your IT plan. Hackers will be no match for an effective patching plan. Here are six ways that patch management can give a company a more solid footing to fend off hacking or security issues.

Way #1: Install a Routinely Updated Patch Management Plan

Having the right IT company, like LaScala IT Solutions, install a patch management plan that automatically and routinely updates is going to keep your network as secure as possible. A strategy that isn’t updated isn’t going to work with the advanced methods that hackers use to gain access to data. Staying one step ahead of them is what patch management is all about.

Way #2: Regularly Test All Patches

Constant testing and monitoring of patches in place are going to keep them healthy enough for the job of protecting the software that it’s meant to do. The right IT team will be able to conduct this kind of testing to make sure everything is running correctly.

Way #3: Switch the Patches if They Aren’t Working

Leaving old patches in place, and not updating them, will leave holes in an otherwise secure system. There are always ways to improve network security with new code being written all the time. Don’t be afraid to update and improve.

Way #4: Use Enterprise Patch Management Tools

These are just the most advanced tools on the market for patch management best practices. Enterprise security is considered all information assets, including workstations, storage, data, and even the servers. Patch management should be installed for each of these components. Physical, virtual, and even cloud-based networks all need evaluations for the right patches.

Way #5: Install New Patches in Off Hours

You don’t want to install patches during hectic times. It’s better for the health of your IT system to be able to install new patches during off-hours. That is usually at night or during the weekend when most of your employees aren’t using the network system. This is also helpful to do in case there is an issue that IT needs to solve quickly by shutting down the whole network to get it done.

Way #6: Have a Failure Plan in Place

If a specific patch doesn’t end up working, an expert IT firm will have a solution in place if it fails. Having a backup for a security plan is vital. A failure of a patch is, of course, the worst case scenario, but it might involve removing a patch, and replacing it with an improved one.

Having a trusted partner in patch management with LaScala IT Solutions can make your IT network more secure. It’s something that companies shouldn’t wait on so that a network isn’t vulnerable to attacks and hackers.

WRITTEN BY
Greg LaScala