Can You Migrate To A Remote Work Model Now That Coronavirus Is Keeping Your Staff At Home?

Work-from-home isn’t new, but it’s never been more popular. As the coronavirus pandemic continues day by day, it becomes more and more important for everyone to do their part in helping to limit its spread by social distancing. This means staying out of the office and working from home

With COVID-19 spreading across the country, a remote work model has never been more important. Do you know how to quickly and securely migrate your organization to a work-from-home model?

Work-from-home isn’t new, but it’s never been more popular. As the coronavirus pandemic continues day by day, it becomes more and more important for everyone to do their part in helping to limit its spread by social distancing. This means staying out of the office and working from home.

Does your business have the capabilities to do so?

How To Migrate Your Business To A Remote Work Model

Getting your business and staff ready for a work-from-home setup involves a number of key steps:

  1. It Starts With The Cloud: Remote working capability is dependent on the implementation of a comprehensive strategy for cloud services delivery. Remote workers need to be able to do their work, and easily. Any obstacles in the user experience will prevent them from staying productive.
  2. Confirm Your Employees’ Capabilities: It doesn’t matter what technologies you have in place if your staff can’t use them. That’s why you need to confirm:
    • User Experience: If your staff is fighting against unintuitive software, a bad connection, or anything else tech-related, their standard workday won’t be all that productive. It won’t be long before your business’ productivity grinds to a halt.
    • Connectivity: You need to check with your staff and find out who has a reliable Internet connection at home. If your staff lives in remote areas with poor connectivity, you may have to consider investing in cellular-data, or have a plan in place to deal with delays on their end.
  3. Determine Which Software Is Right For You: There are a number of consumer and business-class solutions available to users depending on the size of the organization, such as Microsoft SharePoint, OneDrive & Team.
  4. Maintain Data Security: Any crisis like this presents a key opportunity for cybercriminals to strike. Make sure you’re not compromising security in order to provide data access to your staff.
    • Patch & Update: Did you know that one of the most common ways that cybercriminals get into a network is through loopholes in popular software? Much of the software you rely on to get work done every day could have flaws — or “exploits” — that leave you vulnerable to security breaches.
    • Protect Your Network With A VPN: When you use a virtual private network (VPN), your data is encrypted, or hidden, as it moves from your device to the VPN and then continues onto the Internet. That makes it harder for an attacker to identify you as the source of the data – no matter whether you’re on your mobile device’s data connection, or using an unsecured retail Wi-Fi network while you’re in line for coffee.

Both you and your staff need the right tools in order to stay productive. If you’re fighting against unintuitive software, a bad connection, or anything else tech-related, they won’t be able to get much done from home. It won’t be long before your business’ productivity grinds to a halt.

Without the right remote work contingencies, your business won’t be able to stay in operation for the duration of the coronavirus pandemic. While many assume that a simple data backup solution is the beginning and end of Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery, this crisis has shown that it takes more to keep your business operating, no matter what.

If you need assistance launching your remote work capabilities, get in touch with LaScala IT.

WRITTEN BY
Greg LaScala